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shall36

Posts: 6
Status: Offline

Hey gang,

I'm curious as to how other members are shrinking metal. For example, I've heard some people say they just heat metal with a torch and quench it with water. Some use the shrinking disc and technique as shown on this site. Some use a torch, hammer, and dolly. I have seen the last two methods work, but I find it hard to believe that heating and quenching alone is enough to get a controlled shrink.

I am especially curious if anyone has experience on shrinking metal on newer cars which have thinner metal.

Thanks!

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oldgoaly

Posts: 220
Status: Offline

Steve,

Sorry i can't help you with newer cars, most of what i see is pull, cut, weld replacement.
What the heat will do is soften the metal and the metal around it has built in stress that
will thicken the soften/heated metal. With hammer and dolly is similar to a tuck/pucker shrink,
you are forcing the metal into itself on the verticle parts of the metal. Best way to learn is
to mark out some grid line 1/2 to 1" apart and work the metal see what actually happens.
Shaping metal is a hands on learning experience! hard to learn with out making mistakes! almost
everyone has made ever kind of mistake possible, but thats how you learn!
Take care!
tt
i guess i should have mention forming a bowl is the best 1st project Aluminum is easier to
work with till it work hardens. Steel is fine don't get to thick /heavy gauge or you will
wear yourself out.

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11111

Posts: 10
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Steve, For shrink work on thinner guage metal I suggest shrinking with a stud welding gun. When I bought my stud welder a number of years ago I was surprised to learn that it came with a shrinking attachment and that the technique even existed. I have used it for shrinking far more than welding. I think it offers a controlled method of heating the panal especially helpful on thin steel. Hammer some dents on junk panels and practice the various techniques. I've used them all and with practice you will learn which technique is best suited to the job you are working on. John Worden Green Mountain Iowa

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tinbasher1028

Posts: 88
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HI Steve: You're asking about shrinking light gauge sheet metal on todays cars. The key here is controling the metal. I've found that you can shrink with a Oxy/actyl. torch, a stud welding gun or a carbon rod in your mig welder as long as you use the right amount of heat. We used to use as rule of thumb, that a shrink the size of a dime was what you wanted. Now I work to 1/2 of the size of a dime or less. The stud welder gun with the shrinking tip works the best because you have alot of heat control and thats what its all about. Another way is to cold shrink the spot using a small hand held shot bag and 16 oz roughing hammer. Here you want to use the force of the hammer not hammer blows (like driving nails!! Thats a NO -NO.)to draw the metal. Not as effective but it will work.

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