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choppperguy

Posts: 35
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Question Ok, I have clecos and a pliers now! But how do you drill a hole Half in one side and half in the other panal? Or are mose people using a flange and drilling through both?

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unklian

Posts: 517
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They are originally intended for aircraft use,
where lap seams are the norm.

The holes are drilled just slightly larger than the diameter of the rivit to be used.

Some guys will drill a hole on either side of center,
and put a small strip on the back.

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392hemi

Posts: 231
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Ian wrote: They are originally intended for aircraft use,
where lap seams are the norm.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

By lap seams -- you mean that the two panels are just temporarily overlapped in order to drill through both panels and secure them with Clecos. Then once the panels are formed -- they are cut and butt welded. Right?

Terry C

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rog02

Posts: 84
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Temporary Rivet Clamps (CLECOS) are designed to grip two or more pieces of material through a hole drilled for a permanent fastener. Aircraft use several method of finishing skin material ranging from lap joints to flush skin where the seam is positioned over a reinforcing member and each panel is individually riveted to that member. See AC43-13 at http://www.moneypit.net/~pratt/ac43/ for full details on aircraft riveting.
For our use Clecos are generally used to temporarily hold material prior to welding by either drilling holes parallel to the joint and using a backing strip that is removed as the weld progresses or by using small pieces of metal as clamping surfaces that are drilled to accept the Cleco and then positioned so that they capture the edges of the material being welded. If you need to tighten the seam up (remove the gap caused by the Cleco) just file a small notch in the edge of the panels where you place the clamps and weld the hole shut as you finish weld the seam.
Place the Clecos a couple of inches apart and tack weld in between. Remove the Clecos before you finish weld as they have a spring in them that is susceptible to heat damage.
Clecos also have a side clamp version as well as a deep clamp version that come in handy as well.
I assume you have the copper colored Clecos? If so use a #30 drill or 1/8" if you are going to weld it shut.

Roger

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choppperguy

Posts: 35
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Wink Thanks Roger and everyone else! I will try this tonight on the tanks we are building. Forgot about putting a strip of metal behind the seem. See what I can do!

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ccwken

Posts: 33
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Frown Well, how'd it turn out?
All those holes to weld up... yuck. Just the reason I don't use Clecos.
Clecos do have a place in metalworking but patch panels and butt-weld setup is not one of them. I perfer butt-weld clamps.

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mjzulinski

Posts: 5
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i think clecos ar a waste of time if i am holding a lap joint together i use some small self drilling screws used for metal stud construction in the building trades the are cheap and can be reused several times. on a but weld i have some flat magnets i picked up at aswap meat for about 10 cents each there light but they hold well

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